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    Tire or tube Sealants: What works. What doesn't?

    TheMayor1
    Trail Steward - CamRock
    Moderator
    608-772-7833

    May 02, 2012, 02:09 PM

    Do they works for you? If so what brands?
    So they make a mess in the tire?
    Do you need special tubes to use them?
    How do you get it in the tube?


    ~ Chuck Hutchens


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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 02, 2012, 02:32 PM

    Do they works for you? If so what brands?
    I used Slime brand tubes a few years ago that had the sealant factory installed.  They are expensive (for a tube) and heavy as hell.  I only used them on a trip to AZ a long time ago due to thorns and goatheads there.

    http://www.slime.com/shop/category/products/smart-tubes/
     
    So they make a mess in the tire?
    Don't know...I never got a flat with them

    Do you need special tubes to use them?

    See above.  You can inject the slime into the tube though.


    How do you get it in the tube?

    Either get tubes with removable valve cores, or make a hole, inject, then patch.

    I think going full-on tubeless is a better solution.  I used to get a minimum of 1 flat per ride at Blue Mound.  I have had 2 flats since going to tubeless and both were due to cut sidewall (Blue Mound) or picking up a big piece of glass (Kettles).

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    « Last Edit: May 02, 2012, 02:40 PM by Nate Woolever »

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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 02, 2012, 02:43 PM

    If you're talking about tire sealants in a tubeless system, yes they do make a mess inside the tire.  I've not found it a big enough deal to negate the positives I've found with going tubeless.

    One thing to remember...many sealants are latex-based.  It might pose a problem to those with a latex allergy.

    There are sealants out there that aren't latex-based...I'm pretty sure that Bontrager Super Juice isn't.

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    imwjl
    Middleton Bike Park Trail Steward
    Moderator

    May 02, 2012, 04:41 PM

    Set the goals first - racer, heavy duty, general purpose. That because a quick change of tubeless tires trail side or when traveling isn't as easy or at least as clean as conventional setup.

    My observations have been tubeless ready or UST are most reliable but not as light as some achieve converting a standard tire.

    My current and long-term choice is a general purpose tubeless ready tire and I love them. The maker calls them All Mountain. They're a bit slow for a fast Kettles ride but roll easier than tires like Nevigals and offer as much or more traction.

    Availability is one reason I went with Stan's. The stuff seemed to be in about any shop I was in prior to going tubeless. I've been traveling and not able to find parts and items needed, didn't want to increase that risk.

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    XXX

    May 03, 2012, 01:14 AM

    How much are the tubes with the dope inside them already? Or what are they called?

    That sounds like a possible good solution for me.  I get a lot of flats on my one bike and would be willing to try that over buying some stuff and dealing with pooring it in my valve stem and simultaneously spilling it all over my floor, then having the tube explode while I'm pumping it up cause I didn't put it in right and having it all over my ceiling. 

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    imwjl
    Middleton Bike Park Trail Steward
    Moderator

    May 03, 2012, 06:27 AM

    How much are the tubes with the dope inside them already? Or what are they called?

    That sounds like a possible good solution for me.  I get a lot of flats on my one bike and would be willing to try that over buying some stuff and dealing with pooring it in my valve stem and simultaneously spilling it all over my floor, then having the tube explode while I'm pumping it up cause I didn't put it in right and having it all over my ceiling.

    Per our earlier conversations, you need to collect the data. Do the flats happen in the same place, same wheel, same circumstance.

    Recall or mark where the tube was in relation to the tire and the wheel. Then find if the hole is toward tread, spokes, or a pinch flat etc.... If the hole faces tire check the tire in that spot both inside and out. Bend it to see if a little thorn or bit of sharp object is buried in it. If it faces inside make sure there's no burr catching it, that your rim strip is smooth.

    Also try my earlier suggestion of different brand tube. I was getting a lot of flats with two brands of made in Asia tubes and got some more expensive made in France Michelin at Yellow Jersey which took me back to reliability. A few extra $ was almost 100% my one measure but a bargain to not waste time with flats. The more expensive Michelin tubes were also patch friendly.

    There are also simple skills for patching and changing tubes that escape some. Read the instructions and note the sanding, and how the glue should not be wet. When you mount a tube and tire do it with care and in a way that all of tube, tire and rim are seated well. I use talc powder to help seat everything well.

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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 03, 2012, 07:36 AM

    How much are the tubes with the dope inside them already? Or what are they called?

    See the link in Post #2 of this thread.

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    XXX

    May 03, 2012, 12:46 PM

    The link said "no products were found" when I clicked it, I will ask in the bike shop.

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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 03, 2012, 12:54 PM

    Hmmm. It was working when I posted it yesterday.

    Slime Smart Tubes.

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    The_Aaron
    Victory!

    May 03, 2012, 02:03 PM

    Chuck, I've found that running two tires (usually a 700 x 35 under a 29 x 2.2) has really reduced my flats.  May I suggest that option over trying this new sealant trend.  I really can't see something as silly as goop in a tire as becoming part of MTB culture.


    ~ C'mon, lets go for a whirl


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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 03, 2012, 02:13 PM

    That deserves applause!

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    May 03, 2012, 02:24 PM

    I've actually run a tire inside of a tire before as part of an ill conceived ghetto studded tire setup...thumbs down, would not recommend.

    Then again I did not get any flats despite having dozens of screws in my tires, so there's that.

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    Nate W.
    Club Raconteur

    May 03, 2012, 02:27 PM

    I've heard of that solution before too...cut the bead off a fattish slick tire and shove it inside your MTB tire for an overkill tire liner.  Que Lastima did that once on a set of home-made studded tires too.

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    Walt Hougas
    Trail Steward - Blue Mound SP
    To Be A Man...

    May 03, 2012, 07:20 PM

    Do they works for you? If so what brands?
    So they make a mess in the tire?
    Do you need special tubes to use them?
    How do you get it in the tube?

    Using UST tubeless tires, I had zero flats and no sidewall tears. I used Stan's during the first season, then starting the second season, I cleaned it out and ran without a sealant of any kind.

    You know where I do most of my riding.

    Chile Pepper bike shop in Moab, Utah uses ordinary inner tubes with a small amount of Stan's added.

    Walt

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    XXX

    May 03, 2012, 11:10 PM

    I got a tube with the crap inside it allready, it was 7 dollars.  However my guy there recommended I buy a new tire.  I'm gonna try the 7 dollar tube first cause the tread on the tire is very good still.

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